Category Archives: #Food

Spabbit’s Onion Bhajis

img_4777These Bhajis are super easy & quick to make, using little ingredients, and are fantastic when served with a little salad, and Spabbit’s Mint Sauce.

Sometimes I’ll whip up a batch as a quick spicy snack – so easy and cheap to do – I’ll never buy them from a takeaway again!

Ingredients

  • Oil for frying
  • 2 Onions
  • 80g Gram Flour
  • 2 tsp Tandoori Masala
  • 1/2 tsp Hot Chilli powder
  • 1/2 tsp Cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 tsp Mustard powder
  • 1 tsp Paprika
  • 1 tsp Cumin
  • Splash Lemon Juice
  • 50 ml Water

Method

Heat the oil to maximum temperature, either in a deep pan, or in a fryer.

Whilst the oil is heating up, chop the onions into whatever size lumps you like, think smallish chunks or slices. In a large mixing bowl, mix together all the other ingredients bar the water.

Throw in the chunks of onion, and ensure they’re thoroughly coated. Gradually add the water and mix, eventually when mixed well and all the water has been added, the lumps should be sticking together with a gooey batter coating.

Take a tea-spoon at a time of the mixture and drop in to the hot oil. Make sure the oil is deep enough for the bhajis to float around during cooking. Stir around / flip over during cooking to ensure they’re all cooked evenly. Cook for around 3 minutes, or longer depending on the size. Take out and drain on paper-towel.

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Spabbit’s UK Indian-takeaway Mint Sauce.

img_4662For years now, I’ve been after a recipe to exactly replicate the sweet tasty sauce you typically get when ordering from an Indian Takeaway in the UK – the stuff is delicious, and I often found myself ordering more than I needed, just to feast with afterwards.

The sauce is great – you can have it with Indian food, such as bhajis or Samosas, or just as a dip for some tortilla chips (I’ve done that one more than once!)

The best thing about this – it’s cheap & easy to make. This recipe will make 1.2 litres of sauce, or 12 of those little containers you get from the takeaway 🙂

img_4656Ingredients

  • 1 KG natural yoghurt (NOT Greek-style!)
  • A small jar (230g) of Mango Chutney
  • 2 heaped tbsp Concentrated Garden Mint (NOT mint sauce!)
  • Around 30ml of Lemon Juice
  • 8 tsp Granulated sugar or sweetener (Vary to taste)
  • Food colouring to preference

Method
Blend / liquidise the Mango Chutney until there are no lumps. Measure out all of the ingredients into a mixing bowl, then mix well using a hand whisk – pour into containers, seal and refrigerate until needed. I always go by the use-by date of the yoghurt as a guide as to how long this will last in the fridge.

If you find that the sauce is too thick – you can add some milk to thin it out a little.

Enjoy!

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Spabbit’s Lamb Samosas

imageThese Samosas are my first attempt, and I have to say I pretty much nailed it 🙂 Whoever says you need filo pastry is just wrong – they work fine with a basic pastry, the same as you’d use for a stuffed paratha.

This recipe will make around 8 to 10 large samosas, depending on the size you want of course.

Ingredients (For the filling)

  • About 50ml Ground Nut Oil(For frying)
  • 2 Large Red Onions (Finely Chopped)
  • 1 Large handful of frozen peas
  • 500g Minced Lamb (I used frozen)
  • 2 tsb Crushed Garlic
  • 1/2 tsp Turmeric Powder
  • 1/2 tsp Hot Chilli Powder
  • 1/2 tsp Cayenne Pepper Powder
  • 1/2 tsp Mustard Powder
  • 2 tsp Cumin Powder
  • 2 tsp Garam Masala
  • 1 tsp Onion Powder/Granules
  • 1 tsp MSG
  • 1 tblsp Tomato Purée
  • 40ml Lime Juice

Method (For the filling)

Fry the chopped onions and pepper in the oil, with the Turmeric and garlic until cooked. Chuck in the peas around half way thought the onions. Add in the Lamb and continue cooking until browned. Throw in everything else, starting with the dry spices, and mix well, continuing to fry until you’re happy with the consistency – with the minced lamb, the more you fry it, the finer it will become.

You could also throw in some veg such as mashed potato to bind the mixture together a little more – as I was aiming for a mainly meat product, I skipped the additional veg.

In the second batch I made, I had a flash of pure genius, and added a small quantity of grated cheddar, and a little cream cheese (For this quantity, it would be about 50g or 1/6 a 250g tub). The cheese worked amazingly well, binding the filling together without really impacting on the flavour – who says you need spuds? 🙂

Ingredients (For the pastry)

  • 250g plain flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp Ghee (Or soft butter)
  • Around 50ml Water

Method (For the pastry)

Place flour and salt in a bowl, mixing well. Make a well in the middle, add the ghee, fold over, make another well and add around half the water. Fold over and mix / kneed the mixture, adding the water a little at a time, until it forms a smooth elastic dough. Tip out the dough onto a lightly floured surface and kneed some more until very smooth.

Cover the dough with an upturned small bowl for around half hour.

Divide the dough into balls roughly golf-ball sized, leave stand for around 10 minutes or so.

One at a time, press the balls out into a circle shape, and roll out until thin enough that you can almost see through them. When rolled out, the circle should be around 20-25cm across. If you feel the need, you can put a plate over the top and cut a circle, but with practise you’ll be able to do it easily enough.

You can make the circles as large or as small as you want, depending on the size of samosas you’re aiming for.

Method (For combining / cooking)

Cut the circle in half, and on the lower quarters of each half, lightly wet the outside edges (A finger dipped in water does the trick). Place a large spoon full of the mixture onto the pastry, then fold over, pressing the wet edges together to seal them. With practise you’ll know more exactly how much filling you can get away with shoving in there. Press down on the edges to seal the samosa.

You can also seal one outside edge and form a cone in your hand to fill these, personally I’ve found the spoon on and fold over approach easier.

Using a pan with around 2 inches of oil in, or a deep fryer, fry the samosas until golden brown; as they float, you’ll need to carefully turn them over a couple of times during cooking to ensure that both sides cook. If you get a large hole in one, quickly remove and discard, as it will be essentially ruined, and make the oil spit!…

Drain the cooked samosas on some kitchen paper to absorb any additional oil.

Serve on their own, or as part of a meal with some mint yoghurt dip!

Spabbit’s Sweet’n’Sour Hot Curry

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The flavour of this curry is targeted to land somewhere between a Dhansak and a Pathia, a hot and sweet hit with a slightly sour finish.

All the measures are, of course, approximate – any good cook knows a pinch of this and that to taste makes for the best outcome.

Ingredients

  • 50ml Ground Nut Oil
  • 2 Large Red Onions (Finely Chopped)
  • 1 Large Red Pepper (Finely Chopped)
  • 2 Chicken Breasts, (Cut however you want)
  • 2 tsb Crushed Garlic
  • 1/4 tsp Salt
  • 1 tsp Turmeric Powder
  • 1/2 tsp Hot Chilli Powder
  • 1/2 tsp Cayenne Pepper Powder
  • 1/2 tsp Mustard Powder
  • 2 tsp Cumin Powder
  • 2 tsp Onion Powder/Granules
  • 1 tsp MSG
  • 1 tsp Garlic Powder
  • 1 tblsp Tomato Purée
  • 40ml Lime Juice
  • 3 tsp Splenda (Or sugar)
  • 500ml Chicken Stock
  • 1 Tin (400g) Chopped Tomatoes

Method

Fry the chopped onions and pepper in the oil, with the Turmeric and salt until cooked. Add in the chicken and continue cooking until browned. Throw in everything else, starting with the tomatoes, and mix well. With the chicken stock, add this gradually until you’re happy with the consistency, although you might add more as cooking progresses. Simmer for around an hour, that way the flavours will pop, and the chicken will melt 🙂

I normally throw in some garlic flakes as well, but there again, I am a garlic freak!

Another LCHF meal idea!

imageI’m back on the LCHF (Low Carb, High Fat) diet this week, and whilst not bored of the usual recipes, I’m always looking to put a twist on an existing meal, after all a boring diet is one which you won’t end up sticking to.

People are always looking for carb substitutes, but nothing quite hits the spot, so I decided to go the other way, also away from the usual salad – as I don’t know about you, but I do tend to get a little bored with the same accompaniments all the time. Bring on the roast peppers, onions, and tomato tossed in a little salt, pepper and some olive oil – just toss the roughly chopped onions and peppers in the salt & pepper, drizzle lightly with the oil, and roast in the oven for around 40 to 45 minutes at 180 degrees centigrade. For the tomato, just cut in a x shape, not all the way down, and drizzle with some oil, placing in the same pan to roast. Some people prefer to cover the roasting pan with foil and then uncover for the last 10 minutes or so, but I’ve never bothered, and they come out just fine for me. You can also sprinkle some marjoram, or perhaps oregano on top for some extra flavour.

The burger… Well either make your own, or carefully choose a burger with a high meat content – 94% or above. Top with a little black pudding and some grated mozzarella & mature cheddar mix. There you have it, a burger feast which is low carb, healthy and most importantly very tasty and different 🙂

Yes, I know there are some carbs in peppers, tomatoes, onions, and black pudding, however this is low carb, not no carb!

Recipe: Cheesy Tandoori Stuffed Peppers

imageThis recipe is a twist on the Triple Cheese Tandoori Mushrooms, almost the same, however using a little twist of tomato and way more garlic Can you have too much garlic?.

This recipe lists between 2 and 4 medium / large peppers for filling – What I tend to do is make a load of filling, and if I don’t use it all, freeze it for next time, as it’s easy to defrost and fill some peppers to pop in the oven. One stuffed pepper per serving. If you’re not adhering to LCHF, then you could serve with some rice. 🙂

(This is a #LCHF Low Carb, High Fat dish)

Ingredients

  • 2 Large red onions, finely chopped
  • 1kg Minced Beef (80/20)
  • 2 tblsp Tandoori Mix (Click for recipe)
  • 3 tsp Garlic Paste
  • 100g Tomato Paste
  • A fair sprinkle of garlic flakes
  • Chilli Powder or fresh chillies to taste
  • 1 Large chopped tomato
  • 100g cream cheese
  • Between 2 and 4 medium / large peppers to stuff

Method

Fry the minced beef, onions, chillies (If you’re using fresh), and garlic until done; about 10 minutes before the end of the cooking, add in the tomato, tomato paste, and spices. Just as you’re reaching the point where you think it’s cooked, add in the cream cheese and stir until all mixed in.

Slice some peppers in half, and fill with the mixture, topping with cheese. The cheese I use is called Five Counties, and has Derby, Red Leicester, Cheshire, Double Gloucester, and Cheddar – this makes for a wonderfully coloured dish 🙂

Cook in a pre-heated oven at around 180 degrees centigrade for around 35 to 45 minutes – the peppers should be soft, but not collapsing. An important tip for this dish is to join the peppers together with cocktail sticks before placing in the oven – this will ensure they don’t fall over during cooking, spilling their contents everywhere!

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Recipe: Tandoori Chicken

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This Tandoori chicken dish is super easy to make, and only takes around 10-15 minutes prep in total. You may have had something like this from an Indian Takeaway, maybe labelled as a Shashlik (Although that is cooked slightly differently), however probably down simply as Tandoori Chicken.

Serves 2. Don’t be put off this recipe for marinade times, you can do anything from 1 hour to 24 hours, obviously the longer the marinade the better, but don’t be pressured into thinking it has to be an age, it doesn’t!

(This is a #LCHF Low Carb, High Fat dish) – Depending on what you serve it with!

Ingredients

  • 2 Chicken Breasts
  • 2 Red Onions (Large)
  • 3 Peppers, assorted colours
  • 2 Tomatoes (Large)
  • 2 tsp Garlic Paste
  • 3 tblsp Lemon Juice
  • 3 tblsp Greek-style Yoghurt (I use Fage brand)
  • 3 tblsp Tandoori Masala powder
  • Chilli Powder or Cayenne Pepper to taste
  • Salt / Pepper
  • Olive Oil to drizzle
  • Marjoram (Dried) to sprinkle

Method

For the veg (OK, some of it is fruit, if you wanna be pedantic!)

With the veg, do this around 15 minutes before you need to put it in the oven, i.e. whilst the oven is warming up to 200 degrees centigrade.

Cut the tops off the peppers, as usual, remove the seeds etc, then slice into nicely sized lumps, depending on how large you like ’em; personally, I slice into quarters, then each quarter into thirds. The onions, chop up into halves, and then each half into quarters.

Place all the veg, bar the tomatoes, in a large bowl, liberally grind some salt / pepper and toss until coated to your own preference. Drizzle with olive oil, toss again to ensure a good coating.

Place the veg in the bottom of a high sided roasting tin, which you’ve lined with foil (Or use a disposable foil tray), sprinkle with some marjoram.

With the tomatoes, slice in an x-shape , not all the way through, place in the pan with the veg, and drizzle with oil.

For the chicken

Mix together the Lemon Juice, Yoghurt, Garlic, Tandoori powder, Chilli Powder or Cayenne Pepper (If required).

Slice the chicken breasts at a slight angle, again not all the way through. Place them in a flat dish, and cover with the marinade, making sure that you get some into the slices you’ve made. Leave to marinade for as long as you can, not forgetting to refrigerate during this process.

Cooking

Place the marinaded chicken on top of the veg in the roasting tin, as pictured below, then simply place in the middle of the oven at 200 degrees centigrade for 45 minutes to an hour. Around half way through cooking flip the chicken over, then 10 minutes from the end, flip again.

Serve 🙂 Don’t forget to check out the other recipes available in the Recipe Page

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Obsessive Compulsive System Checks (OCSC)…

Daily, Hourly, and perhaps every other minute I’ll check things, items, conditions. In my role as a geek, a systems engineer, I can’t help but compare my checks to systems checks – making sure all the components are there, all functioning correctly, all talking to one another, and no unexpected changes have occurred since the last check.

Many geeks will do the same thing, their baby systems will be checked, and the checks will be checked, ad infinitum. I have the same thing about my body at the moment. Until around 10 months ago I didn’t care – it existed, doing it’s own thing, only the odd system alert would flag anything up to the brain… You know, in geek terms:

Back pain +1, potential for system disablement. lol.
Farting too much, need a shit. Output dump – 10 minutes 😉

Now though, now I’ve lost the weight, it’s a constant battle to stop looking at the new body, to stop feeling the tightness factor of the new clothes – as if, by magic, I’ll put the weight back on between one breath and the next. Obsessive Compulsive System Checks. I have to constantly remind myself that the weight built up over decades, not in a blink, and it came off in half a year of solid work and obsession over every aspect of the diet. Years and Months, changes measured in Years and Months, I tell myself three times, Years and Months. Not seconds.

This is why we’re not in danger from Skynet, why the machines will not rise and kill the humans, they’ll soon come down with OCSC, either that, or they’ll all discover Tetris, Solitaire, or Candy Crush

I did have a dream, still do have the same dream, from when my age was measured in single digits, until this day – the dream terrified the younger version of myself, before I evolved, mentally. It’s an abstract dream, where I can imagine both infinite and finite volumes of space, not just visually, but in every sense, every feeling. In the dream reality flicks between the two, I feel both agoraphobic and claustrophobic at the same time. Now when I have the dream, there is some kind of flag there, which tells me that it’s just a dream, and the dream is a system error, that everything is normal – the dream reality stops spinning out of control, dream-reality immediately snaps into sharp focus and stops the mind bending behaviour, front and centre, gravity restored, fixed points of reference all there and accounted for, systems checks all complete. Sometimes, I wonder if the dream is leaking out without me noticing?

Sexist supermarkets in the UK, Lacking Customer Service!

SupermarketsDear Supermarkets, mainly Asda, Tesco, and Sainsburys.

Why are you so sexist towards men?

I’m a man. Yes, it’s true. It’s also true that I like to buy clothes, and shoes. Going naked is frowned upon.

For years now Supermarkets have done a decent job for women in the UK, the ranges are always expanding, and what’s more all the sizes are there – no longer do you find discrimination against the larger female form, in most cases. The clothes, shoes, boots and slipper ranges are phenomenal, amazing even.

Men. You hate us, right? In most cases, if we’re lucky, there are 10 to 15 styles of shoes, as opposed to perhaps 100 to 200 for the female ranges. Do you all think we don’t need shoes, that we’re all centaurs and have hooves instead? I really can’t think why you don’t want the business of half the population, it baffles me. Really.

The discrimination doesn’t end there, the general clothing range for men is abysmal, for every ten rows of female clothing, there are, if we’re lucky, two for men. I’m really fed up of seeing this blatant disregard for me as a customer in all the stores.

DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT. Correct this situation today, it’s not too late, please.

And on to the second topic from the taglineWHAT customer services!?

Every time I go to customer services, I’m treated like a moron, generally made to wait in a growing queue, because perhaps there is one under paid staffer on the counter, and they’re expected to cope on their own with the lottery, cigarettes and so called customer services.

So… Assuming that I haven’t given up the will to live, even from a distance, looking at the pathetic lone example of a store-peon behind the counter, and make it there… THEY CAN’T BLOODY DO ANYTHING. That’s right – their existence is pointless unless for the most basic of requests. They can’t take feedback, they can’t take suggestions and pass them along, they can’t do anything – the point of contact for customer-feedback is null and void.

Examples I hear you ask? Well here is a personal experiance, #Tesco and #Sainsburys in this example:

Cat food. I own cats, a few… I buy cat food, the own brand tins with gravy. This is always, and I mean always understocked, in whatever supermarket I’m in. I clear the shelves on a regular basis – I’m talking 120 tins a month here. I WANT to give you people money, but I can’t as you never have enough stock.

… So I brave the queue to the pathetic peon staffer (Sorry, not your personal fault) to complain about the consistent lack of stock… And, guess what!? They can’t do anything! One time I even got the ‘Dried Goods Manager’ (Good title, right, the title implies authority) – WHO CAN’T DO ANYTHING. That’s right folks, the manager of the department can’t do anything. “Fill in this form”, “Write to head office”, we can’t possibly take your query after you’ve just wasted yet another valuable portion of your life away queueing here waiting to speak to someone in authority, no way can we help you.

WHAT’S THE POINT of having someone there if they can’t do anything? Where is the feedback channel, where is the friendly face of customer service, how can we help you improve if you do not listen, if you treat us like cattle, and take us for granted?

Do you not realise that if I can’t get this one important item in store, I won’t visit your store, you won’t get the golden foot-fall, I won’t spend any money in your store, I’ll go elsewhere, where they give a damn, listen and supply me with what I actually want. Silly people. Just one example. I have many more examples, however I fear that the feeble flesh glued by nature onto my bones can’t withstand so much pounding away at the keyboard if I were to list them all.

Respond to this article, #Sainsburys, #Asda, #Tesco, #Morrisons – show me you listen, and further do something about the blatant sexist attitude towards men, and the lack of regard for your customers. Show me you can be better, I dare you.

UK Government Morons and Pointless Taxes!

The Guardian - More Sugar Tax proposed!

The Guardian – More Sugar Tax proposed!

The current bunch of Tory wankers in power have bowed to the wishes of non-thinking-tabloid-press twatbags, introducing a fucking sugar tax. S U G A R tax… Now I understand the intentions behind this are basically to reduce sugar intake for the general public, but tax is the wrong way to do it. Wrong. Plain and simply wrong. Why?

  • Tax is their answer to everything, and it’s a lazy one.
  • Tax doesn’t help, people will just spend more.
  • If Tax is so bloody effective, why are there still smokers in the UK, or drinkers for that matter?
  • Tax just hurts people, reduces their liberties and opportunities.
  • Tax hits the less well off sectors of society disproportionately hard.
  • Tax just doesn’t effect the rich.

What would work? What are the alternatives to punitive financial measures applied in an idiot-blanket fashion? How about the following, for starters

  • Education for the public, not boring government documentary films, but programs outlining and exposing the amount of sugar in many supposedly healthy foods.
  • Ad admission that they were wrong about ‘diet’ foods where the fat has just been replaced with sugar.
  • Legislation for food manufacturers to stop using sugar wherever possible, putting back in the fat and alternative sweeteners.
  • Legislation for the food manufacturers to reduce size (AND Price!) for chocolate / candy bars / sweets.
  • Graphic advertising of what just a few hundred extra calories per day can do to you.

TAX is just lazy, the laziest way of getting around a perceived problem without effort of thought, an ineffective solution, proven by studies in Mexico where it has had an impact of just 6 calories per day!

TAX… In the UK this is simply laughable, around 22% of my salary is already taken as tax, with what’s left I have to pay yet more tax – Council Tax, Vehicle Tax, VAT, and Fuel Duty… Plus there are probably more I’m still blissfully unaware of. And now SUGAR fucking tax – pretty soon we’ll all just be working for the government, as there won’t be any money left from our pay after tax, we might as well be working in a communist state soon.

I’m one of the lucky ones in this case, I’m off sugar for health reasons, my eyes were opened a long time ago to dangers of this substance, and whilst I still enjoy the odd treat here and there, I won’t really feel the impact personally. That doesn’t make this right though. The people need to speak up, to make the government understand that we’re not all morons, we know what we’re doing, and if we don’t, education is the key, not more bloody tax.

Recipe: Creamy Garlic Chilli Lime Chicken

imageWhere do I start with this one!? This is a recipe of two halves which complement each other perfectly. Depending on how you serve this, it can be a LCHF dish.

On one half you have perfectly seared and cooked butterfly chicken, and on the other a creamy zesty sauce. I suppose you could do this with chicken pieces, or bashed-flat chicken breasts, but I thought the butterfly style would be best!

Ingredients For the chicken…

  • 2 Chicken breasts, butterfly cut
  • 2 tsp Garlic Paste / Crushed Garlic
  • 1 tsp Chilli Lime Flavouring
     (If you can’t get this, use some lime juice and chilli flakes)
  • 1 tsp Pimentón
  • 4 Drops Liquid Smoke – optional
     (You can buy this from deli shops)
  • Olive Oil – enough to coat the chicken
  • A little chopped fresh parsley

Ingredients For the sauce…

  • Around 40g Salted Butter
  • 1 Half a red onion, very finely chopped
  • 4 tsp Garlic Paste / Crushed Garlic
  • 1 tsp Chilli Lime Flavouring
     (If you can’t get this, use some lime juice and chilli flakes)
  • 1 flat tsp Mustard powder
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 flat tsp MSG – Optional
  • 3 tsp Lemon or Lime juice
  • 200ish ml Chicken Stock
  • 3 tlbsp Extra Thick Cream
  • A little chopped fresh parsley

Method for the chicken

Mix the oil, garlic, chilli & lime flavouring, pimentón and liquid smoke together in a small bowl.
Butterfly cut the chicken, and brush on the oli/garlic mixture.
Using a hot griddle or Teppanyaki grill, cook the chicken until done, as pictured below. Towards the end of the cooking, sprinkle on some fresh parsley, not so much for flavour, but more for looks, you can flip the chicken and cook on the parsley.

You could just bash the breasts out, until they were the same thickness all over, however as said I just prefer the butterfly cut, does the same thing, but doesn’t break down the chicken so much whilst ensuring it cooks evenly. A tip with this one is to pre-heat the grill on maximum, searing the chicken on both sides before turning down slightly and finishing it off.

Method for the sauce

Fry the onion and garlic in a medium pan until done, add in the other spices, lemon / lime juice, leaving out the parsley. Add in the chicken stock and mix well, simmer down / reduce a little, say for around 10 minutes.
Turn down the heat to minimum levels.
Add in the extra thick cream and mix in well. Keep on a minimum heat. DO NOT LET THIS BOIL.
Throw in the chopped parsley, mix well.
At this point in time, the sauce should be barely pourable – if it’s too runny, cook off some more, again be careful to keep this from boiling.

If you taste the sauce half way though, you’ll probably think it’s a bit too zesty, but don’t panic – the cream will dampen down the flavour whilst adding so much lovely texture.

… Serve with whatever you use – in the example I used some new potatoes, but you can use anything; if you want to keep this an LCHF dish, don’t use carbs alongside 😉

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Recipe: Double Cheese Garlic Chilli Mushrooms

IMG_3192A dirty and quick dish to prepare, but will add something out of the ordinary as a side, or part of a meal; you could even use them as a starter.

On their own, the mushrooms are compatible with an #LCHF (Low Carb, High Fat) diet, and are vegetarian. I decided to be bad when I had ’em, and served with some spiced fries, and deep fried jalapeños stuffed with cream cheese… Mmmmmm! 🙂

Ingredients

  • 4 Large Flat Mushrooms, with the stems removed
  • Around 50g Unsalted Butter
  • 2 tsp Minced/Crushed Garlic
  • 1 tsp Harissa Powder (Or paste)
  • 1/2 tsp Pimentón (A little more to sprinkle on top as well)
  • 50/50 Mix of Mature Cheddar and Mozzarella (Grated) to top
  • Salt & Pepper to taste
  • Olive Oil

Method

Melt the butter, mix in the herbs, spices and garlic.
Remove stems from the mushrooms, chop the stems finely, mixing them into the butter/garlic/spice mixture to form a coarse paste.

Brush the mushrooms with Olive Oil and place onto a foil covered baking tray.
Spread the paste evenly over the shrooms, and top with the cheese mixture.
Sprinkle a little Harissa, and some pepper over the cheese topped mushrooms.

Cook in a preheated over at 180 degrees centigrade for around 20-25 minutes until done 🙂

Some thumbnails of the process below, click for the full size images…

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My #LCHF Weight-Loss Journey

LCHF Food PyramidI’ve just published a page (linked here, or from the site menu above) detailing the long, and still ongoing journey where I embarked on the Low Carb, High Fat diet.

Inside six months on the diet, I lost 70lbs / 30kgs and 12 inches from my waistline, my wedding ring had to be resized – five sizes smaller, and I can now comfortably fit into regular clothing. My health has improved immeasurably and my life is better – hell, if you do this right, it’s even cheaper to eat. Please go have a read if you’re at all interested in a life changing way of eating – the page doesn’t have all the answers, and you’ll need to do a lot more research if you want to follow it, however it does have the basics, and my experience.

Recipe: Sweet Minty Kashmiri Yoghurt Dip #LCHF

IMG_3119This is a #LCHF Low Carb High Fat Recipe for Sweet Minty Kashmiri Yoghurt Dip – this is the kind of minty / spicy sauce / dip you get served in Indian Restaurants. It’s VERY addictive, and can be served with anything you like – in the LCHF vein, this would of course, be salad, or maybe bacon? 😉

The quantity here makes two portions – the yoghurt tub is 170g. This is a very simple yet effective recipe, and would be very easy to scale up, if needed.

Ingredients

  • 1 170g pot of Greek style Yoghurt (I use Fage brand)
  • 1 tsp Patak’s Kashmiri Masala Paste
  • 1 heaped tsp Dried Mint (Or fresh if you have available)
  • 1 level tsp Splenda

Method

Simply mix everything together until well blended.

With this recipe there are a couple of adjustments you can make. For example, if you wanted this more of a pouring sauce, not a dip, add cream or milk. The flavour can be balanced out by varying the amount of Kashmiri Masala Paste etc…

Why is this LCHF? It’s not, and it is… It’s not as there isn’t going to be that much fat in this recipe, unless you add cream etc; however it does fit in with an LCHF diet in that the portion should contain around 4g carbs (Even when I’m down to 15g carbs a day, this would fit into my diet).  I have an as yet untested theory that you could substitute the yoghurt for full fat mayo, however I think you’d have to increase the other ingredients as the mayo would mask the stronger flavours a little more…

Be careful when you buy the yoghurt though, various brands can have a lot more added sugar than others, Fage is very good, which is why it’s the only one I use.

Details for the ingredients below:

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Recipe: Triple Choc-chip Cookies

IMG_3105This recipe makes the perfect cookies, so good that whenever I’ve made them, I’ve been accused of trying to pass off commercially made cookies as my own! Make ’em today, you won’t be disappointed 🙂

Ingredients

  • 380g (13oz) Self Raising Flour
  • 225g (8oz) Caster Sugar
  • 175g (6oz) Unsalted Butter
  • 100g (4oz) Milk Choc Chips
  • 100g (4oz) White Choc Chips
  • 75g (3oz) 70+% Coco Dark Chocolate
  • A few drops of Vanilla Extract
  • 1/3 tsp Baking Powder
  • 2 Large Eggs

Method

Chop the butter up into lumps, also do this for the chocolate. Melt them together on a LOW setting in a microwave oven or in a pan on the hob, until they’re both liquid and mixed well.

Mix everything (Save for half of the flour) together, when everything is mixed well and the choc chips are evenly distributed, add the other half of the flour and continue to mix until you’re left with a smooth dough apart from the choc chips that is!

(Make sure the butter/chocolate isn’t too hot or your chocolate chips will melt when everything is mixed together!)

Place the mixture in the fridge for 20 minutes to half hour, and whilst the mixture is cooling, heat the oven to about 160 degrees centigrade.

Remove the dough from the bowl and divide into about 36 equal balls (I pat the thing out into a flat sausage shape and cut bits of mixture off, rolling into balls).

Put the balls about 5cm apart on (Non-stick) baking trays, I normally flatten the tops a litte, and bake in the preheated oven for about 11 minutes at 160 degrees centigrade.

NOTE: All ovens are slightly different, you may need to experiment with the right combination of heat and time to bake your cookies correctly – the times I use are for my electric fan oven!

The cookies will be done when they’re firmish to the touch and browning at the edges.

Remove from the tray and place on a wire rack to cool.

When cool, remove to an air tight container to keep the crunch inside 🙂